Practical matters to attend to

Lifeindenmark.dk gives general answers to most questions. For a more elaborate answer, feel free to contact your local municipality.

Indhold

    Below is a selection of informationfrom LifeInDenmark.dk, a part of the common public portal in Denmark called borger.dk.

    For further information about life in Denmark, visit the website.

    Go to LifeInDenmark.dk

    03.10.2019 12:36

    Practical matters to attend to

    EU-Residence document (EU/EEA and Switzerland)

    As an EU citizen or a citizen from Switzerland you may freely enter Denmark and remain in this country for up to three months without an EU residence document (registration certificate). If you are a job seeker, you may reside in Denmark for up to six months without a registration certificate. The periods of three and six months are calculated from the date of entry.

    If you expect that your stay in Denmark will last more than three months, you have to apply for an EU residence document (registration certificate) before the expiry of the three months. Job seekers are required to submit their application within six months after entry.

    Nordic citizens

    If you are a citizen of Finland, Iceland, Norway or Sweden, you need not to apply for a registration certificate because as a citizen of a Nordic country you have a right to reside in Denmark without permission.

    For more information about residence as an EU/EEA citizen:

    More help on EU residence document

    You can get help at one of the four International Citizen Service centres located in four mayor cities in Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Aalborg and Odense.

    Find additional information about residence in Denmark under EU rules at:

    Residence and work permit (outside Scandinavia, EU/EAA and Switzerland)

    If you are a citizen from a country outside Scandinavia, the EU/EEA or Switzerland, you must apply for a residence and work permit in your home country through a Danish mission, i.e. a Danish Embassy or a Danish Consulate General.

    In the majority of cases, your future employer in Denmark will contribute with information for the application. There are several different options for a residence and work permit in Denmark. Your education, qualifications and the type of job you have been offered are important to how you should apply.

    Be aware that after 20 May 2012, all non-EU citizens over the age of 18 applying for residence permits under the terms of the Aliens Act must have their biometric features (facial image and fingerprints) recorded when submitting their application. Biometric features will also be recorded when applying to renew a residence permit and when applying for permanent residence.

    You must also be aware that a Danish authorisation can be a condition for your residence and work permit. For example, this applies if you are going to work as a doctor, dentist or a schoolteacher.

    Read more about how you can apply for a residence and work permit:

    Civil Registration number (CPR number)

    In Denmark each person has a personal registration number, which is called a CPR number. CPR stands for Central Person Register. The CPR number is essential in relation to any contact with the Danish authorities and especially in connection to tax and social security issues.

    If you are coming to Denmark to work for more than three months (six months if you come from an EU/EEA country or Switzerland), you need to apply for a CPR number at the Danish National Register (Folkeregistret)”.

    You can contact your local municipality’s Citizen Service Centre or one of the four International Citizen Service Centers, available in the largest cities in Denmark: Aalborg, Aarhus, Copenhagen and Odense.

    What to bring to get a CPR number

    To get a CPR number you should bring along:

    • Your work and residence permit (if citizen outside the EU/EEA, the Nordic region or Switzerland)     
    • Assignment/employment contract - Passport or personal ID     
    • Proof of your address in Denmark (e.g., rental contract)
    • If applicable, documentation for changes of name (marriage/divorce certificate, etc.)
    • If applicable, birth certificates for your children
    • If applicable, a marriage certificate.

    If your wife and children accompany you to Denmark they must also register and obtain a CPR number. Once you have informed the municipal authorities of your arrival and have received a CPR number, you are included in the general Danish health insurance scheme. You will be asked to choose a doctor from a list provided by your respective municipality.

    If you are coming to work for 3 month or less, you will get a tax number instead of a civil registration number. Your personal tax number works like a civil registration number, i.e. it is your Danish personal registration number.

    Health Insurance Card (the "yellow card")

    When you work and move to Denmark, you are covered by the Danish health insurance system.

    Most examinations and treatments are free, when you have a health insurance card.

    The health insurance card is documentation that you are entitled to the services offered under the national health insurance scheme. You must therefore always bring your card with you when you go for treatment.

    When you are covered by the national health insurance, you can register with a doctor/general practitioner (GP) and receive a (yellow) health insurance card. It is advisable always to carry this card with you as it is required whenever you need to see a doctor, a dentist or go to hospital – or when you want to take out books from the library.

    Approximately two weeks after you have registered, your national health insurance card will be sent to your Danish address. The card will show your name and address, your CPR number and the name and address of your doctor.

    The blue European Health Insurance Card

    If you need medical treatment during travels in the EU, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein (EEA), or Switzerland you will have to use the blue European Health Insurance Card.

    How can you order the blue European Health Insurance Card

    If you are covered by the Danish health insurance, you can order the card for free online. If you, in the case of special circumstances, are not able to order the blue card online, you can contact Udbetaling Danmark by phone +45 70 12 80 81.

    Health insurance for children and young people

    Children are covered by the health insurance scheme together with their mother or father until they reach the age of 15. However, children must have their own health insurance card. Children born in Denmark automatically receive a health insurance card when they are christened or named.

    Once children are 15 years old, they are insured independently of their parents and are free to choose their own GP.

    International health insurance

    The international health insurance rules vary according to where you are travelling to, how long you plan to be away for and the purpose of your trip.

    If you travel within Europe for less than a month, you are covered by the tourist health insurance scheme in most cases.

    If you travel within Europe for more than one month or for purposes other than holidays or studies, you will need a European health insurance card (in Denmark also known as the blue card).

    Special rules apply if you travel in the Nordic region, Greenland, the Faroe Islands or in Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

    If you travel outside Europe, or if the tourist health insurance card or the European health insurance card does not provide sufficient cover, you should think about taking out private travel insurance.

    If you spend more than six months travelling, you normally lose the right to health insurance cover in Denmark.

    Additional information

    You can contact your local municipality – their citizens’ service if you need help or further information.

    To open a bank account

    When you receive salary from your employer it is useful to have a bank account. To open a bank account, you just need to contact a bank of your own choice. Remember to bring photo ID (e.g. your passport) and address information.

    You can only open a bank account with a Danish bank once you have obtained your tax card. As you are not a registered citizen in Denmark, the bank will want to see your:

    • Passport
    • Tax card
    • Contract of employment and payslip
    Nemkonto (Easy Account)

    As a resident in Denmark you will might need to open at least one Danish bank account to obtain an Easy Account (NemKonto).

    An Easy Account is an account where payments from the public authorities are transferred directly. Your basic account can be designated as an Easy Account.

    An Easy Account is a normal bank account into which payments from public institutions (e.g. tax refunds, child subsidies, student loans and unemployment benefits) can be transferred directly.

    Opening a bank account is free of charge. It is advisable to take your contract of employment if you have one.

    You can easily change your Easy Account if you get a new bank. A normal account can be converted to an Easy Account either by the bank or directly by you - if you have an Easy ID (NemID).

    You do not necessarily need a bank account yourself to have an Easy Account. If, for example, you use your spouse’s bank account, you can designate this account as your NemKonto.

    More information on the Easy Account:

    Tax and registration

    When you come to Denmark to work, you will need a civil registration number (CPR number) or a personal tax number, depending on whether you take up a short or a longer residence in Denmark.

    CPR number – if longer period in Denmark

    If you are working in Denmark for more than three months (six months if within EU/EEA or Nordic countries), you will need to apply for a CPR number at the Danish National Register (Folkeregistret).

    You can always contact your local municipality’s Citizens Services Centre or one of the four International Citizens Services Centres in Denmark in: Aalborg, Aarhus, Copenhagen and Odense.

    Personal tax number – if short period in Denmark

    If you are working in Denmark for three months or less, you will get a tax number instead of a civil registration number. Your personal tax number works like a civil registration number, i.e. it is your Danish personal identification number.

    To get a personal tax number

    You can have a personal tax number without having a CPR number.

    Personal tax numbers are given to those who come to Denmark but cannot get a civil registration number (CPR number), eg. because they only work in Denmark for a short period - see section above.

    You can request a personal tax number by completing form no. 04.063 from SKAT (available in four languages).

    You can also contact your local tax centre or one of the International Citizens Services Centres to obtain your personal tax number.

    Remember to bring form no. 04.063, ID with picture, such as passport or ID card, and marriage certificate (if you are married).

    Citizens from outside the EU, Switzerland or the Nordic countries must also bring a work permit. Your personal tax number works like a civil registration number, i.e. it is your Danish personal identification number.

    If you have previously worked in Denmark, you will already have a civil registration number or a personal tax number.

    When you have completed the form 04.063 and attached the documents required, you will receive a preliminary income assessment (forskudsopgørelse) within two weeks. In the top of your preliminary income assessment, you will see your personal tax number.

    Read more about the preliminary income assessment in the section below.

    Tax card

    In order for your employer to know how much tax to deduct from your salary, you need a tax card.

    You can apply for a tax card by following the same procedure as used for the personal tax number in the section above.

    This means that you must complete form no. 04.063 from SKAT.

    You can also contact your local tax centre or one of the International Citizens Services Centres.

    You should then bring:

    The above mentioned form no. 04.063, ID with photo, such as a passport or ID card, marriage certificate (if applicable) and your work permit if you are a citizen from outside the EU, Switzerland or the Nordic countries.

    The tax card contains information about your withholding rate, deductions and allowances. You can see your tax card information on the first page of your preliminary income assessment (forskudsopgørelse).

    When you have completed the form (04.063) and attached or enclosed the documents required, you will receive a preliminary income assessment (forskudsopgørelse) within two weeks.

    In your preliminary income assessment, you can see your withholding rate, your monthly tax-free allowances and deductions, and what SKAT expects your income and allowances and deductions to be. The tax card (primary tax card, secondary tax card or tax exemption card) is a part of your preliminary income assessment. Your employer will receive your tax card directly from SKAT. You cannot hand in your tax card yourself.

    Note that your tax card is part of your preliminary income assessment.

    Places to get help - International Citizen Service

    There are a great many things to take care of when you arrive in Denmark as a foreign employee.

    You can always get help at one of the four International Citizen Service Centres (ICS) placed in the largest cities in Denmark. Located in Aalborg, Aarhus, Copenhagen and Odense. If you live outside these cities you will might have to contact your local municipality.

    All the public authorities you typically need to contact are represented at these four International Citizen Service Centres. The ICS centres make the contact to Danish authorities as easy as possible. In most cases, you will only need to visit an ICS centre in order to take care of your paperwork with regard to residence permit, registration certificate, tax card, civil registration number (CPR), health insurance card etc.

    You can also get help at International House Copenhagen.

    How to get help with online self-services in Danish

    Most of the online self-services are in Danish, but you can always get help to fill in forms and online applications at the local citizen service center or at the library. Or maybe you can get help from a Dane. Remember to bring your NemID.

    Written by lifeindenmark.dk, The Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration, the Danish Tax Agency (Skattestyrelsen), Business Region Aarhus and Consortium for Global Talent
    21.04.2020 18:11

    CPR - Registration in Denmark

    Civil Registration number (CPR number)

    In Denmark each person has a personal registration number, which is called a CPR number. CPR stands for Central Person Register.

    The CPR number is essential in relation to any contact with the Danish authorities and especially in connection to tax and social security issues.

    If you intend to stay for a period of 3 months or more (6 months if within EU/EEA or Nordic countries) you must notify the municipal authorities (Folkeregistret).

    Note that a permanent address is mandatory to obtain a CPR number.

    How to obtain a CPR number in the Greater Copenhagen Area

    Since June 1st 2017, it is mandatory to apply for a Civil Registration Number online after you have been granted an EU registration certificate / a residence permit. You will be notified when your CPR number is ready for pick up at International Citizen Service-Centre in Copenhagen. Note that CPR Numbers can only be picked up by personal appearance.

    How to obtain a CPR number in other areas in Denmark

    You can contact your municipality’s local Citizen Service Centre or your nearest International Citizen Service Centre in Aalborg, Aarhus, or Odense.

    Which documents do you need to apply for a CPR number?
    • Work and residence permit (relevant if you are a citizen outside the EU/EEA, the Nordic region or Switzerland)
    • Assignment/employment contract
    • Passport or personal ID
    • Proof of your address in Denmark (e.g., rental contract)
    • If applicable, documentation for changes of name (marriage/divorce certificate, etc.)
    • If applicable, birth certificates for your children
    • If applicable, a marriage certificate.

    You should ask for a receipt of your notification and for a personal (civil) registration number.

    My family is accompanying me - should they register?

    If your wife / husband and children accompany you to Denmark they must also register and obtain a CPR number.

    Danish health insurance scheme

    Once you have informed the municipal authorities of your arrival and have received a CPR number, you are included in the general Danish health insurance scheme. You will be asked to choose a doctor from a list provided by your respective municipality.

    Request for a residence certificate

    If you need to document your present or former addresses, you can request a municipality to issue a residence certificate. A residence certificate costs up to DKK 82 (2018). You must request a residence certificate online. If you do not have the possibility to use the Internet yourself, you may get assistance from the municipality’s citizen service or the library.You can only obtain a residence certificate for another person if the person in question has authorised you to do so by means of a letter of attorney.

    Written by lifeindenmark.dk and Consortium for Global Talent
    21.04.2020 18:11

    Healthcare

    Coronavirus / covid-19 in Denmark

    For information, latest news and hotlines from the Danish authorities about coronavirus/covid-19, please visit:


    National health insurance

    Denmark has an extensive public healthcare system that offers free consultation and treatment at a local doctor’s, emergency wards and public hospitals.

    If you work legally in Denmark, you are covered by the Danish health insurance system. Most examinations and treatments are free, but you need to register and get a health insurance card.

    Children are covered by the health insurance scheme together with their mother or father until they reach the age of 15 and are insured independently of their parents.

    Getting your health insurance card

    When you are covered by the national health insurance, you can register with a general practitioner (GP) and receive a yellow health insurance card. The health insurance card is documentation that you are entitled to the services offered under the national health insurance scheme. You can order the health insurance card through the 'Self service'-section above.

    Approximately two weeks after you have registered, your national health insurance card will be sent to your Danish address. The card will show your name and address, your CPR number and the name and address of your doctor.

    It is advisable always to carry this card with you as it is required whenever you need to see a doctor, a dentist or go to hospital – or when you want to take out books from the library.

    Order a new health insurance card

    Here you can order a new yellow health insurance card (“sygesikringsbevis”). The card is free of charge in connection with a change of address – and with a change of name after getting married.

    The blue European Health Insurance Card

    If you need medical treatment during travels in the EU, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein (EEA), or Switzerland you will have to use the blue European Health Insurance Card.

    Who can get the blue European health insurance card?

    You can get the blue European health insurance card if you live in Denmark, are a citizen of an EU country, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland and you are covered by national health insurance in Denmark.

    In special cases, you may be entitled to a European health insurance card if you:

    • live abroad and work in Denmark or
    • are posted by a Danish employer to work in another country.

    In addition, you may be entitled to a European health insurance card if you are a stateless person, a recognised refugee or a family member of a person covered by national health insurance in Denmark. A family member is your spouse or common-law partner and your children under 18 years of age. However, parents of children who are citizens of an EU/EEA country or Switzerland are not entitled to a blue European health insurance card.

    How can you order the blue European Health Insurance Card?

    If you are covered by the Danish health insurance, you can order the card for free online.

    If you, in the case of special circumstances, are not able to order the blue card online, you can contact Udbetaling Danmark by phone +45 70 12 80 81

    GP – your family doctor

    Once you are registered in the Civil Registration System, you are entitled to choose a general practitioner (GP) you can contact if you fall ill.

    Your GP will also handle prescriptions, vaccinations, and certain types of contraception, and will also assist you with regard to disease prevention.

    You will need to make an appointment before going to see your GP. If you fall ill or suffer an injury outside your own GP’s normal opening hours, you can call the out-of-hours medical service.

    In most cases, the GP is your entry point to the Danish health-care system. If you need to be treated at the accident and emergency department (A&E) or receive hospital and specialist treatment, you will usually need a referral from your GP.

    You can choose which GP you prefer with regard to sex, age, etc. The choice of GP is made in connection with the issuance of your personal health insurance card.

    The citizen services of your municipality will give you a list of doctors you can choose between. You can register with a new GP whenever you want to. It costs a small fee.

    Private healthcare

    Apart from the public healthcare system, Denmark has a number of private hospitals and health clinics where you pay for treatment. The public health system has waiting lists for certain kinds of treatment, in which case you may choose a private hospital or clinic to avoid waiting for treatment. In some cases, the public healthcare system will pay. Regardless of whether you choose public or private treatment, the quality of medical treatment in Denmark is generally very high.

    Many Danes have health insurance that covers the expenses for using private healthcare services. The insurance covers services, which may mean that you in certain cases will be diagnosed more quickly or have certain kinds of surgery performed more quickly at a private hospital than the public hospital can offer. Private health insurance typically covers services not covered by public authorities, for example physiotherapy, zone therapy, and a number of other services. At a number of Danish workplaces, a health insurance is part of the employment contract and is paid by the employer.

    In addition, you can choose to take out an insurance policy through the health mutual insurance company “danmark” (Sygeforsikringen “danmark”), which will reimburse you some of your medical expenses for glasses, dental treatment, medicine, etc.

    Hospital treatment

    If you need to be examined or treated at a hospital, you must first obtain a referral from your own GP, a specialist doctor or from the out-of-hours medical service.

    You will receive an appointment from the hospital, which will send information on where and when you need to come.

    You are entitled to interpreter assistance if the doctor deems this necessary.

    Medicine and pharmacies

    Prescription medicines are only available for purchase at pharmacies. A doctor's or dentist's prescription is required in order to purchase prescription medicines.

    Over-the-counter medicines are available for purchase without a prescription at pharmacies and approved supermarkets, kiosks, drug stores and petrol stations.

    Most pharmacies are open from 9:30-17:30 on weekdays and from 9:30-13:00 on Saturdays. If you need to purchase medicine outside of these opening hours, most major Danish cities have a 24-hour pharmacy.

    Dental care

    In Denmark, there is a partial charge for dental care. You have to pay for check-ups and treatment, but part of the bill is government funded. This amount is automatically deducted from your bill.

    You are free to choose any dentist. You may choose any dentist of your own choice, and once you are assigned to a clinic, the dentist is responsible for asking you to come for check-ups at regular intervals.

    Children and young people below 18 years of age are entitled to free dental treatment.

    If you have an accident involving your teeth, there are emergency dentists that are open outside normal opening hours.

    The Danish healthcare sector

    Denmark is divided into five regions. They are in charge of running hospitals and (through collective agreements) managing the general practitioner system.

    The hospital sector is responsible for specialised examinations as well as treatment and care of somatic and mental illnesses. A GP will refer patients to a hospital or to a specialist for specialised treatment.

    Hospital treatment is free of charge for residents in any region of Denmark, and emergency treatment is available to any person in need.

    How to get help with online self-services in Danish

    ​Most of the online self-services are in Danish, but you can always get help to fill in forms and online applications at the local citizen service center or at the library. Or maybe you can get help from a Dane.

    Remember to bring your NemID.

    Written by lifeindenmark.dk, Business Region Aarhus, Sundhed.dk, Consortium for Global Talent, Workindenmark.dk and City of Copenhagen
    21.04.2020 18:11

    Insurance

    Private insurances

    In Denmark three insurances are mandatory by law:

    • Liability insurance if you own a motor vehicle
    • A dog insurance if you have a dog
    • Insurance against fire if you own real estate.

    All other private insurances are voluntary. For instance basic family insurance (“familiens basisforsikring” or “indboforsikring”) that in most cases consists of:

    • Contents insurance covering personal property in the event of theft, fire, or water damage
    • Personal liability insurance
    • Legal protection, covering lawyer expenses for certain legal matters

    In addition, it can be reassuring to have a private accident insurance. In Denmark, social security is covered by the Danish state, but as a supplement there are private health insurances. Read more at the section on healthcare.

    The insurance premium can vary from one insurance company to another. Generally, insurance papers in Denmark are only available in Danish.

    Written by lifendenmark.dk, Workindenmark.dk, Consortium for Global Talent, Business Region Aarhus and Consortium for Global Talent